Category: Trees

What a wet, wet, wet Tree Planting.

Year 6 pupils from St Albans R C Primary took part in a fantastic tree plant in the Cemetery today and despite the rain….a good time was enjoyed by all. Our thanks to Birmingham Trees for Life for organising this planting event, to replace some of the aged ‘Poplars’ felled recently.

Birmingham Trees for Life had lots of assistance today as they were joined by the Lord-Lieutenant of the West Midlands- John Crabtree and his wife, who came well prepared to plant alongside the pupils.

Our local Councillor, Mike Leddy, popped along and  a gaggle of Tree Officers also made an appearance!!

Our thanks to everyone at BTFL for continuing with this tree replacement project and the Tree Officers, local Ranger Dean and BCC Woodland Team for making this all possible. Following the event everyone enjoyed a ‘warm up’ in the Lodge with drinks and biscuits.

As they made their way back to school, Ranger Dean led a short Tree Walk for pupils with lots of interesting information. Despite the miserable weather we all had a lovely morning and the cemetery now has 10 more interesting standard trees along its boundary.

Our thanks to Bereavement Services staff and the ‘Friends’ who also supported this event.

 

Tree Planting with Birmingham Trees for Life

Lets hope the weather is dry for us this Wednesday 27th as we will be welcoming Birmingham Trees for Life and pupils from St Albans R C Primary School to plant yet another 10 trees in Brandwood End Cemetery.

Last year we sadly lost a number of large Poplar Trees from one of our boundary areas but with the help of Birmingham Trees for Life we are slowly replacing them with more suitable species.

 

 

Wet, but colourful Tree Walk !

Ranger, Dean Paul, led a Tree Walk through the cemetery today despite the heavy rain.

Considering how cold and wet it was there was a good turn out of 11 hardy individuals, but the weather didn’t detract from the glorious colours displayed by the trees and the knowledge imparted by Dean.

We also spotted some amazing fairy rings of fungi.

Enjoyable Tree Walk, despite the weather!

Despite the damp and drizzle over 16 folks turned up to The Lodge at 11am yesterday to join BCC Park Ranger Dean Paul’s excellent 2 hour plus ‘tree and cemetery walk’.

Combining his extensive knowledge of Brandwood Cemetery from his previous role as a member of the ground maintenance/grave team with his current role as a City Park Ranger for South Birmingham, Dean covered an wide range of fascinating and instructive topics.   I am sure that everyone who attended found the whole experience hugely instructive and worthwhile.

Spotted on the walk was this industrious Squirrel’s dinner table!

Our thanks to Dean for his time. He hopes to do a further ‘walk’ when we have some Autumn colour so watch this site for the date.

Victorian’s vision for Brandwood’s trees

The amazing photographs below were taken by one of our facebook supporters and  I think they shows the amazing number and variation of trees in Brandwood End Cemetery…close to 1700 individual trees, planted following a grid template by the great landscape designer ‘Louden’.

We must remember that when these trees were planted, around 1899, they would have been very small saplings and the people who planted them knew they would never personally enjoy the scene they were creating!

We must also remember our significant avenue of Redwoods…..

Aerial views…..

Our thanks to a local drone operator who shared these magical views with us.

In the following higher shot you are able to get a small insight into the amazing trees within Brandwood End. We are hoping to arrange a walk around the cemetery with Dean, our local Ranger but as local people will know- their time is very much at a premium.

I hope the residents of Kings Heath realise the amazing green space that sits quietly on their doorstep. Luckily for us, the local wildlife are well aware of their opportunities and the cemetery is home to Muntjac deer, Foxes, Hedgehogs, Squirrels,Woodpeckers, Owls, birds of prey……….and many species of familiar birds.

Old Oak damaged by storm Hannah

Today we received the photo below and a message from the City Tree Officer:-

‘Unfortunately one of the mature Oaks adjacent to the Jewish Cemetery suffered severe storm damage over the weekend.
The tree has been assessed and found to have several severe structural defects.
Due to the prominent location of the tree the decision has been made to have it removed.’
Birmingham City Council’s tree service provider will be on site tomorrow to undertake the work.

Normally the Tree Officer likes to leave the main structure of a tree standing as ‘habitat’ if it needs to be felled through age etc but unfortunately, as you can see, that is not possible in this case. It is very sad, but nothing lives forever and the main tree stock in Brandwood End is 125 years old or more, so losses have to be expected. The Friends hope we can work with the Tree Officer and Bereavement Services to plant young trees to naturally take over from these beauties!

 

 

 

Major tree work continues in the cemetery.

Tree contractors, Idverde, have crown lifted many conifers (removed lower branches) and other species, as well as removing Ivy from the lower 6 feet of trunks along the Sunderton road boundary.

Regular visitors to the cemetery will have noticed a huge increase in tree work in the last year. This has followed a survey to determine the safety of many of the older and diseased trees, to prevent damage to graves, property and people in the future. Brandwood End was opened in 1899 and many of the trees were planted then or, in the case of some of the oaks, before that date. Oaks often live for several hundred years but many other species have a much shorter life expectancy and that is the case with many of our 1700 plus trees!

 

We have seen major crown lifting on both sides of our Wellingtonia avenue, large trees removed on the Broad Lane boundary, Poplars removed along the Sunderton Road boundary, Woodland reduced on the pool end of Sunderton road and various trees crown lifted or removed across the cemetery.

On the plus side, great care has been taken to consider wildlife with trees left untouched that are being used by Woodpeckers, ivy growth removed in some areas and left in others for nesting, standing tree stumps left to improve biodiversity and logs piled for Hedgehog use.

A tree replacement programme has been started and a number of new trees have already been planted by local pupils. The Friends hope that this can continue, provided funding can be found.